Projects Archive

Projects Archive
  • 'Good Practice ...
  • 'Islam in Today...
  • 'The role of fa...
  • Better Future
  • Bridging the Gap
  • Building Futures
  • Community Partners
  • EMO
  • Employers Compl...
  • FAITH ACTION
  • Faith Communiti...
  • Faith Initiatin...
  • Faith leaders M...
  • FRF Delegation ...
  • FRF UK in Australia
  • FRF UK's First ...
  • HOME TO WORK
  • INFORM
  • Learning for Work
  • Online Kiosks
  • Parliamentary C...
  • Routes to Emplo...
  • Self-Employment...
  • Skill Leap
  • The Faith Commu...
  • The London Coun...
  • Understanding Islam
  • Upskilling Fait...
  • Work Placement UK
  • ICT for Ethn...
  • 'Good Practice Guide: Engaging and Empowering Faith Communities in Housing and Regeneration'

    Further to FRF's highly successful first international conference in collaboration with the Philadelphia Cathedral and the Islamic Society of North America [ISNA] in 2004, our Good Practice Guide was launched in July 2005. This guide endeavours to outline some practical means and recommend some approaches, which can be taken to engage and empower faith communities in the Housing and Regeneration arena.

    Published in 2005

  • 'Islam in Today's World' Conference

    Dr Husna Ahmad was invited by the Cambridge Inter-Faith Programme to attend the Islam in Today's World conference at Lancaster House. A number of key figures were given a rare opportunity to come together and debate what Islam in Today's World means for Europe, the Muslim World, and beyond.

    This conference hoped that by bringing academics, religious leaders and policy makers into dialogue, there would be a downstream effect whereby the benefits of such an initiative would inform policy and thus reach the people and communities served and whose lives are most affected by these issues.

    Other conference speakers included Tony Blair, David Cameron, Ruth Kelly, Emine Bozkurt, and Richard John Carew Chartres. Gordon Brown also gave an evening reception for the delegates.

    Published in 2007

     

  • 'The role of faith-based groups in welfare provision' speech

    In February 2007, Dr Husna Ahmad was invited to speak on 'The role of faith-based groups in welfare provision' at a conference held by the DWP and hosted by the then Minister fo State for Employment and Welfare Reform, Jim Murphy MP, as part of their wider contribution to the Pathways to the Future process in Manchester.

    Published in 2007

  • Better Future

    The Better Future Project aimed to engage unemployed women the BAME communities, particularly in Bangladeshi, Pakistani, and Afro-Caribbean communities. Beneficiaries partook in a programme of ESOL, basic skills, employability skills and basic ICT training which was directing these women to jobs in childcare and sewing.

  • Bridging the Gap

    Lack of confidence, assertiveness, self-esteem, motivation and low levels of basic skills can lead to long-term unemployment.

    This project aimed to provide employability skills by enabling BAME communities, lone parents and refugees access to basic skills programmes that offer support in literacy, numeracy, ESOL and key skills. The beneficiaries had access to accredited advice and support services.

    Published in 2003

     

  • Building Futures

    The core aim of Building Futures is to test a new way of collaborative working between the voluntary and community sectors (VCS) and the private sector to improve the effectiveness of employment support for BAME communities. Funded by the treasury/Cabinet Office with the lead partners being BTEG and Talent, Building Futures is being delivered in the London Boroughs of Brent, Hackney, Newham, Tower Hamlets and Haringey. The core objectives of this project are to support those who are hardest to reach to overcome barriers to employment, to build the capacity of VCS organisations and to develop a network of co-dependent partnerships.

    Published in 2007

  • Community Partners

    Community Partners is an ESF London Councils co-financed programme that aims to engage lone parents in various short courses as well as NVQ level 1 and 2 in Childcare. FRF's Community Parents project, in partnership with Auralern, will equip students with the necessary skills to pursue careers in childcare and will produce qualified local carers who can provide culturally-sensitive, affordable provisions for people both within and beyond their communities. Community Parents seeks to tackle the high unemployment rate amongst lone parents with low skills in the London Boroughs of Brent, Enfield and Harrow.

    Published in 2007

  • EMO

    Jobcentre Plus' Ethnic Minority Outreach (EMO) initiative provided outreach, employability and job search to help people who wanted to make the transition into work. This project supported jobless people who had traditionally been excluded from the labour market.

    The EMO team had been commended for trying to curb the startling unemployment statistics among London's Pakistani and Bangladeshi communities. The team achieved astonishing results with this group through their specialized knowledge and intense work, including the outreach workers personally driving Muslim youth to jobcentres, engaging with their clients outside of regular business hours and uploading CVs on laptops in mosques. This innovative approach brought job advice and training to places of worship and to those who would rarely participate in mainstream provisions.

    Approximately 700 beneficiaries were engaged during the two year contract and 221 Job Outcomes were achieved.

    Published in 2006

  • Employers Compliance in the field of Religious Discrimination

    Following the recommendations under the Employment Equality (Religion or Belief) Regulations 2003, FRF was commissioned by the Department for Trade and Industry [DTI] to hold this one day event in March 2005, at Alexandra Palace, London. The conference was attended by over 100 delegates and succeeded in raising awareness about the issues of religious discrimination within employment and training, and proposed steps that can be taken in the workplace in the light of the new legislation.

    Published in 2005

  • FAITH ACTION

    Faith Action was a new national network that aimed to represent faith-based and community organisations that were engaged or seeking to become engaged in the delivery of public services, and to support the increase of public service delivery by faith based and community organisations.

    Faith Action represented faith based and community organisations to policy makers at both a national and regional levels and developed a range of capacity-building resources designed to help faith-based and community organisations deliver public services more effectively. Central government departments and agencies as well as regional organisations consulted with Faith Action when commissioning public service delivery through faith-based organisations.

    Published in 2007

  • Faith Communities Navigator

    Faith Communities Navigator

    Britain's high streets, schools, universities, and workplaces have never been more diverse. In these times of increased population movement, high media interest, international conflict, increased secularism and for many, a search for the spiritual, there has never been a more important time to explore, understand, and appreciate our faith communities.

    The Faith Communities Navigator is a new and exciting addition to the armoury available to those wishing to know more about the lives, beliefs and values of the UK's diverse faith communities. Developed exclusively by FRF's Policy Unit, the Navigator aims to allow users to be able to navigate their way through the rich and diverse patchwork that is represented by the UK's faith communities and build upon FRF's previously well received work in this area on behalf of third sector, UK Government, and commercial clients.

    The Faith Communities Navigator will provide organisations in the public, private, and voluntary sectors with a detailed resource and training programme to guide them through the lives and beliefs of Britain's major faith groups. It will help them meet their obligations under the employment equality regulations and, most importantly, will help them provide better services and employment conditions that take into account the needs and obligations of those from faith groups. Using expert contributors from a wide range of faith groups ensures that there is now a resource that provides a balanced and authoritative view of faith in Britain and a tool to build better services and businesses.

    Published in 2007

     

  • Faith Initiating Regeneration – the FIR Project

    The FIR project is one of several in FRF UK's portfolio which addresses the needs of faith based organisations in reaching their cull capacity. FRF UK, through its subsidiary, Faith in London, was familiar with the potential to support the objectives of the Learning and Skills Council. Many had access to large pools of volunteers, could readily identify potential beneficiaries and provide easily accessible facilities that would make suitable bases for training or other community regeneration initiatives. However, their infrastructure was too underdeveloped to maximize the potential of their resources.

    "It helps one to improve oneself as well as the community because you are able to better deal with the community."

    Segum Olaleye New Hope Christian Centre, a FIR beneficiary

    "I think this is a shining example of the kind of programme that we are all committed to encouraging and expanding. The idea of regeneration is a very powerful one. It is about bringing new life to communities, about giving opportunities that maybe have not been around in those communities in the recent past. Sometimes when we talk about regeneration it is somehow seen as mainly about bringing in new resources from outside of a community. But I think what we learn is that in fact the most successful examples of regeneration are where people are able to harness and marshal their own resources and energy and enthusiasm from within those communities."

    Hon. Stephen Twigg, MP, Minister of Schools

    "Projects like this promote social inclusion, they helpd to give people in the community confidence and the organisations that can best support those individuals, those are the kind of skills to ensure that community members do the best."

    Vivian Cutler, Executive Director LSC East

    Published in 2003

  • Faith leaders Management Training

    Two years ago, the London Development Agency funded a leadership training course for fifteen London Imams. Entitled, "Upskilling Faith Leaders to Lead High Performance Communities," the programme, developed by our partner Murad Associates, related verses of the Holy Qur'an to the social, economic, and spiritual problems encountered by members of the Muslim community. Participants received guidance on how to incorporate information about social issues into Friday Sermons at mosques.

    The success of the project led to the development of a national pilot programme funded byt the national Learning and Skills Council which leads to a fully recognised NVQ Level 3 qualification in management and supervisory skills. It is offered in five areas of the UK – London, Manchester, Leeds, Bradford, Birmingham, and Leicester.

    The course ensures that, in addition to their traditional theological and spiritual training, Imams and community leaders in British Mosques are also equipped with knowledge of the social problems facing British Muslims and the skills to advise them on how to manage those challenges.

    We are looking to extend the Management Training programme to other faith groups, to women from BME communities and young leaders.

    "The LSC is committed to working with faith communities with a view to increasing the participation of young people and adults from a wide cross-section of our community in learning. Faith and community leaders play a crucial role in any local area. Your activities have a direct impact on the people that you live with and that you work with day in and day out. I think through this programme you could become even greater role models and ambassadors for learning."

    Margaret Coleman, LSC Regional Director, Yorkshire and The Humber

    "I am a very strong believer in the notion that faith communities have a central role to part to play in promoting high standards of education as well as promoting the principles of citizenship and inclusion which I think lie at the heart of this particular project... and I am very confident that this will be a positive and successful programme one from which we will be able to learn a great deal and one which will contribute to the promotion of a just, multi-faith society as well as strengthening education within that society."

    Hon. Stephen Twigg, MP, Minister for Schools

    Published in 2004

     

  • FRF Delegation to Philadelphia Cathedral

    As a result of discussions with Philadelphia Cathedral, a delegation from the FRF visited the US to exchange ideas on partnership working and finding new solutions. The Cathedral occupies a key location between academia and the inner city, with bustling multi-cultural neighbourhoods on its doorstep. Our discussions led to a unique joint conference to be held 17th -19th February 2004, in Philadelphia, USA.

    The aim of the conference was to discuss successful housing and regeneration initiatives in building positive and inclusive communities. Recent experience in UK and USA indicate a need for greater understanding of faiths and a commitment to finding solutions within a multi-faith society. Senior government officials from UK, USA, Malaysia and Bangladesh were in attendance. The conference brought together policy maker, faith leadership, academics, and community practitioners.

    Published in 2002

  • FRF UK in Australia

    Representatives from Faith Regen, Chief Executive Saif Ahmad and Director of Strategy Jo Jones, were invited as guest speakers at a colloquium held at the University of Melbourne. The theme, 'Managing Muslim-Christian Relations: Educational Policy Options for Promoting Interfaith Harmony,' allowed them to share their perspectives on promoting the development of education and skills through faith-based organisation.

    Published in 2004

  • FRF UK's First International Conference

    In 2004, FRF UK held its first international conference, in partnership with the Philadelphia Cathedral and the Islamic Society of North America.

    Over one hundred delegates from around the world attended the three-day programme of events at the Ritz-Carleton hotel in Philadelphia between 17th and 19th February 2004. The conference, entitled 'Building Positive Inclusive Communities through Housing and Community Renewal: An International Conference on Good Practice in Muslim Christian Initiatives,' led to a lively debate and sharing of good practice in the fields of housing, education and employment and how they contribute to community regeneration.

    Valued contributions were made by The RT. Hon Baroness Dean of Thornton le Fylde, House of Lords, UK; Hon Stephen Timmes MP, Minister for E-commerce and Postal Services, British Government; Mr Jeremy White, Associate Director of Faith and Community Based Initiatives at the White House, USE; Luqman Gamble, Chairman and Founder of Universal Companies, Philadelphia, USA; Ali Mujahid, Minister for Social Welfare, Bangladesh and Dato Iqbal, Secretary General ASEAN Business Forum.

    Despite persistent media headlines of conflict around the world, a fair portion of it apparently religious in nature, there are faith communities across the world that are doing their best to create a more just and harmonious society.

    We met one such community through our conference in Philadelphia. Universal Companies is a holistic community development organisation, led by Muslims who live and work for the benefit of their neighbourhood. It includes a school (with a Christian principal), community centre, affordable housing, business support services and a health centre.

    I think it's so important that we work together through Christian-Muslim partnerships in our community to really make a difference in our social services both here and around the world."

    Jeremy White, Assistant Director Office of Faith and Community Based Initiative, White House, USA

    "It's up to us to find the policies, institutions and the people who can bring the efforts of globalisation to everyone. These are the fundamental needs of poor people, good housing, transportation, and child care, but also the need to creative expression, spiritual refreshment; connection with the wider society."

    Gordon Conway, President Rockefeller Foundation

    "The excitement of living in a city, a city like Philadelphia or London or any other great city in the western world, is that we find ourselves in the same valley with a lot of cultures, traditions, and insights that are different from where we come from and where we are going. So the city is the place, despite all its problems – and sometimes its violence – where we find ourselves thrown together to make or break what it means to be fully human... and for us to talk to one another, to learn from one another, seems to me the highest priority facing all religions in the world."

    Rev Richard Giles, Dean of Philadelphia Cathedral

    Published in 2004

  • HOME TO WORK

    The Home to Work project was extremely successful in enabling learners to effectively communicate in English and thereby reduce their isolation from society. Subsequently enabling them to move into further education, training, voluntary and paid employment. It also demonstrated excellent partnership working between FRF, Wai Yin, Training Wise and Inspired Sisters.

    Through a 12 week programme, each learner was supported to achieve their desired level of qualification either in Basic Skills, ESOL, DIY, Construction and Maintenance.

    Key achievements: 70 women from different BME groups engaged in training, 8 women working toward NVQ 2 in DIY and Construction, 45 women gaining Basic Skills and ICT qualification, 11 women progressing into education and training.

    Published in 2007

  • INFORM

    INFORM

    INFORM stemmed from a conference that was held in partnership with the National Health Service University (NHSU).

    Funded by the Department of Health, the project aimed to achieve better health provision and information for BAME groups. We aimed to inspire confidence in ethnic minority groups and open doors for provision of information as well as provide engagement with preventative measures within faith communities, through our on-line touch screen kiosks.

    This 3-year project aimed to create a framework for mapping faith sensitive provision within NHS organisations. The project targeted London, Manchester and Bradford.

    Published in 2007

     

  • Learning for Work

    The project was in response to a hypothesis that inadequate command of the English language could be one possible cause of social exclusion among the different multi-lingual communities of British society. It was designed to meet a variety of needs so that participants with varying levels of literacy and confidence would all benefit at an individual level. To achieve this, innovative methods of delivery were developed supported by a partnership among community groups.

    Published in 2003

  • Online Kiosks

    The kiosks were developed as an innovative and interactive way to facilitate the process of community empowerment. Whether in a faith based organisation setting or in a housing association, the Online Kiosk aided those who wished to find out about the opportunities available to them.

    By providing learning and training information in eight different languages it enabled engagement with minority communities that are both meaningful and productive, overcoming one of the major social exclusion barriers.

    Published in 2002

     

  • Parliamentary Citizenship Programme

    The Parliamentary Citizenship Programme was an innovative initiative that aimed to enable members of ethnic minority faith communities to become engaged in politics and the political process. Along with other activities, the programme included an interactive seminar on citizenship and political engagement, a visit to an MP at the House of Commons and a visit to an MP's constituency surgery.

    The participants in this project included many representatives from religious institutions as well as members of parliament.

    Published in 2003

  • Routes to Employment

    Routes to Employment was a project funded by the LDA which aimed to support the transition of BME groups, mainly refugees into society. ESOL was initially delivered in a faith/culturally sensitive environment and focused on entry to employment in the catering, cleaning and construction sectors.

    Published in 2006

  • Self-Employment Programme

    Funded by the department of Work and Pensions through the lead provider TNG/Inbiz, the self-employment project provides business training and support to long-term unemployed beneficiaries of the Jobcentre Plus "New Deal" programme. Clients who are interested in starting up their own business are helped write their business plan, trained in business processes as well as having the opportunity to try out their business idea for up to 6 months. During this 'test trading' they continue to receive support from the benefits system and receive regular counselling from their business advisor.

    Published in 2007

  • Skill Leap

    The Skills Leap project offered a pathway to employment for 250 beneficiaries who had experienced difficulty in securing permanent employment. These were drawn from unemployed 16-19 years old, the long–term unemployed and BAME groups. It provided training in ESOL, Basic Skills, elementary ICT and employability skills. It was complimented by an enrichment programme, designed to inspire beneficiaries and allow them to ''walk with excellence'' in developing new talents.

    Key achievements: 500 new beneficiaries supported through training 160 beneficiaries achieved ESOL/Basic Skills qualifications.

    Published in 2006

     

  • The Faith Communities Toolkit and Awareness Training

    A generic toolkit is now available as part of a popular training programme – The Faith Communities Toolkit and Awareness Training. The courses have been developed in response to the recent introduction of the Employment Equality Regulations 2003 in the UK and include:

    1. How to use the faith communities toolkit

    2. Spirituality at work

    3. BME and faith communities awareness training

    4. Religious discrimination legislation training

    Our consultancy team also works with individual organisations to research, design and build a customised toolkit tailored exactly to your brand and needs.

    Originally designed as a reference manual for Jobcentre Plus staff, Faith Regen's UK's Faith Communities Toolkit provides information about the main faith communities in the UK. It highlights traditions and practices and focuses on employment issues and how to engage with people from different faiths.

    "A first step in celebrating diversity is understanding our different backgrounds and beliefs. This toolkit gives our managers easy access to information on a range of faith traditions in our community."

    Hamish Elvidge – Sainsbury's Finance Director and Board Champion for Equality and Diversity

    Published in 2004

     

  • The London Councils European Services in Brussels to mark the European Year of Equal Opportunities for All and the 50th anniversary of the European Social Fund

     

    Dr Nujhat Jahan was invited to make a presentation at an event organised by The London Councils European Service in Brussels to mar the European Year of Equal Opportunities for All and the 50th anniversary of the European Social Fund.

    Published in 2007

     

  • Understanding Islam

    Essentially comprising of a one-day training opportunity designed by FRF's Policy Unit in response to significant research and media analysis, Understanding Islam represents a new and innovative approach to an issue that is universally recognised: the need to understand and appreciate our neighbours.

    Delivered jointly by Muslim and non-Muslim, male and female facilitators, Understanding Islam aims to be a participative, enjoyable, informative and challenging. The facilitators will endeavour, with the cooperation of the participants, to provide a context for European Islam, discussing key issues such as gender, custom, and practice, as well as exploring some of the everyday aspects of European Muslim life, such as food, worship, employment, and the home.

    The programme, whilst offering a great deal of information, has been designed to be interactive with case studies and workshops on specific areas of European Muslim life, specifically commissioned film clips and opportunities for debate.

    However, above all, Understanding Islam is designed to challenge stereotypes and help in an appreciation of a high profile, growing, and increasingly diverse faith community.

    Understanding Islam is not designed to deliver a level of detailed doctrinal knowledge or to engage in technical debates about the nature of religion or Islam. It is not designed to proselytise or to seek to promote Islam or an Islamic way of life. It is not a forum for overt political debate or the promotion of a particular point of view.

    Published in 2007

  • Upskilling Faith Leaders

    Muslim Imams in multi-cultural Britain have to expand their role to encompass the spiritual and practical aspects of life.

    To equip Imams for this new role, FRF developed a course called ''Up-skilling Imams to Lead High Performance Communities.'' This course built on traditional Imam training to provide them with management and community leadership skills, to enable them to better serve their communities.

    Published in 2003

  • Work Placement UK

    Workplacementuk.com was designed to unleash the potential of thousands of jobseekers in local communities.

    Building on the huge success of Faith Regen UK, Workplacementuk.com provided a total package for those entering, or re-entering the job market. It combined on-the-job training and job brokerage providing vital skills training for jobseekers who had difficulties accessing mainstream advice and learning provisions regarding the job market.

    Published in 2005

  • ICT for Ethnic Minority SMEs

    Although ICT clearly holds the key to better efficiency and productivity in the world of business, several studies show that small to medium sized enterprises (SMEs) have been slow to implement computer technology to improve their operations.

    Our project was designed to give entrepreneurs a strategic edge without overwhelming them with traditional business jargon and approaches. Through our subsidiary Faith in London, we conducted a full ICT audit and developed a strategic plan of education and implementation, which was specifically tailored to the needs of the business that were audited

    Published in 2003